Teva Announces Fda Approval Of Generic Tobi(r) In The United States

Julio Dely Valdes’ charges trail fourth-place Mexico by three points, meaning they have to beat the USA and hope Mexico lose away to Costa Rica. That scenario appears unlikely, with Mexico still harbouring hopes of an automatic qualification berth from the CONCACAF section. But with the United States already confirming their place in Brazil next year, Panama will be confident of an upset against Jurgen Klinsmann’s outfit. If Panama are to secure an improbable intercontinental play-off with New Zealand they will have to arrest a run of four games without victory. That included a 1-0 defeat to the United States in the CONCACAF Gold Cup final in July, but they will be well backed by the Estadio Rommel Fernandez Gutierrez support. Panama’s hopes of a play-off spot were dealt a blow after they lost 2-1 to Mexico on Saturday. Luis Tejada had cancelled out Oribe Peralta’s opener, but with just five minutes remaining Raul Jimenez notched a crucial winner. The United States are already assured of their place as group winners, as they hold an unassailable lead over second-place Costa Rica. Klinsmann’s team have lost just twice in nine outings in the CONCACAF group, and their latest success came with a 2-0 home success over Jamaica on Friday. It took until the 77th minute to find the breakthrough as Graham Zusi netted before Jozy Altidore confirmed the win. Panama’s task is made even more daunting by the USA’s recent form. The United States have tasted defeat just once in 15 matches and head into the fixture in buoyant mood following Friday’s success.

Actually, the United States Has Defaulted Before

ET Teva Announces FDA Approval of Generic TOBI(R) in the United States Text JERUSALEM–(BUSINESS WIRE)–October 14, 2013– Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) announces today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted approval of the generic equivalent to TOBI(R) (Tobramycin Inhalation Solution USP) in the United States. Pursuant to an agreement with Novartis on this product, Teva expects to launch this product in late November. Marketed by Novartis, TOBI(R) had annual sales of approximately $350 million in the United States, according to IMS data as of June 30, 2013. About Teva Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) is a leading global pharmaceutical company, committed to increasing access to high-quality healthcare by developing, producing and marketing affordable generic drugs as well as innovative and specialty pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients. Headquartered in Israel, Teva is the world’s leading generic drug maker, with a global product portfolio of more than 1,000 molecules and a direct presence in about 60 countries. Teva’s branded businesses focus on CNS, oncology, pain, respiratory and women’s health therapeutic areas as well as biologics. Teva currently employs approximately 46,000 people around the world and reached $20.3 billion in net revenues in 2012. Teva’s Safe Harbor Statement under the U. S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This release contains forward-looking statements, which express the current beliefs and expectations of management. Such statements are based on management’s current beliefs and expectations and involve a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could cause our future results, performance or achievements to differ significantly from the results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. Important factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include risks relating to: our ability to develop and commercialize additional pharmaceutical products, including our ability to develop, manufacture, market and sell biopharmaceutical products, competition for our innovative products, especially COPAXONE(R) (including competition from innovative orally-administered alternatives, as well as from potential purported generic equivalents), competition for our generic products (including from other pharmaceutical companies and as a result of increased governmental pricing pressures), competition for our specialty pharmaceutical businesses, our ability to achieve expected results through our specialty, including innovative, R&D efforts, the effectiveness of our patents and other protections for innovative products, decreasing opportunities to obtain U.S.

The United States is still getting rid of its chemical weapons

Its a great talking point. One that helps bolster the argument that default should not be an option in Washington s latest debt limit showdown. Theres just one teensy problem: it isnt exactly true. The United States defaulted on some Treasury bills in 1979 (ht: Jason Zweig ). And it paid a steep price for stiffing bondholders. Terry Zivney and Richard Marcus describe the default in The Financial Review (sorry, I cant find an ungated version): Investors in T-bills maturing April 26, 1979 were told that the U.S. Treasury could not make its payments on maturing securities to individual investors. The Treasury was also late in redeeming T-bills which become due on May 3 and May 10, 1979. The Treasury blamed this delay on an unprecedented volume of participation by small investors, on failure of Congress to act in a timely fashion on the debt ceiling legislation in April, and on an unanticipated failure of word processing equipment used to prepare check schedules. The United States thus defaulted because Treasurys back office was on the fritz in the wake of a debt limit showdown. This default was temporary. Treasury did pay these T-bills after a short delay. But it balked at paying additional interest to cover the period of delay. According to Zivney and Marcus, it required both legal arm twisting and new legislation before Treasury made all investors whole for that additional interest.

At the Bluegrass plant outside Lexington, Kentucky, there are 523 tons of mustard agent, VX and sarin nerve agents. Officials predict the job of destroying that arsenal, which is slated to start in 2020, will be completed in 2023. Where is Assad hiding chemical weapons? A convoy of inspectors from the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons prepares to cross into Syria at the Lebanese border crossing point of Masnaa on Tuesday, October 1. Inspectors from the Netherlands-based watchdog arrived in Syria to begin their complex mission of finding, dismantling and ultimately destroying Syria’s chemical weapons arsenal. The U.N. Security Council votes to approve a resolution that will require Syria to give up its chemical weapons during a meeting on Friday, September 27. The vote came after assertions by the United States and other Western nations that the Syrian government used chemical weapons in an August 21 attack outside Damascus that U.S. officials estimate killed 1,400 people. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said the world community was imposing a binding obligation on the government of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to get rid of its chemical weapons stockpile. A man mourns over the bodies of those killed in a suspected chemical weapon attack in a suburb of Damascus, Syria, on Wednesday, August 21. Syrian rebels said poisonous gas rained down from rockets, but authorities have denied the allegations that they used chemical weapons and accused the opposition of staging the attacks.