New Iphones Draw Lines Around The World

Shinnyo Lantern Floating For Peace Draws Thousands Of New Yorkers To Central Park To Celebrate Peace

Huguette Clark’s lawyer Wallace Bock also would get nothing. Clark’s mansion in California, Bellosguardo, would become a foundation, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art would get $10 million. Clark was briefly married in her 20s. Her assistant has said she didn’t leave her apartment for decades before she was taken, emaciated and beset by advanced skin cancer, to Beth Israel Medical Center in 1991. Doctors said she was medically ready to leave months later. But she chose to stay for two decades, at a cost of about $400,000 a year. And she rewarded the hospital beyond that, as well as her caregivers. Gifts to Peri, Clark’s chief nurse, included multiple Manhattan apartments and a $1.2 million Stradivarius violin, and the nurse stood to get $30 million in the disputed will. Clark’s primary doctor received cash Christmas presents totaling $500,000, among other gifts, plus a $100,000 bequest that he was preparing to relinquish before testifying at the trial, according to court documents. The hospital got hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash, a $3.5 million painting by French pre-Impressionist Edouard Manet and a $1 million bequest. Clark’s accountant and her lawyer also received sizable cash gifts, and they stood to reap substantial fees as executors of her estate under the challenged will. Clark’s relatives had said hospital executives, medical professionals, Clark’s lawyer and accountant took advantage of their access to the heiress to manipulate their way into her millions of dollars. The beneficiaries have said Clark was simply a generous woman who wanted to help those who helped her. ___ Associated Press writer Jake Pearson contributed to this report.

Tentative deal in dispute over New York heiress’ will

“That’s the only reason I’m in line, so I can get it on day one,” he said. “They definitely screwed it up for a few of us by not preselling the 5S.” Others brushed off that inconvenience, focusing instead on the new features. Ana Ramirez, who began waiting on line in New York at 4 a.m., said she was excited to try out the new Touch ID fingerprint sensor on the 5S. “I get the iPhone every year. It’s just the best phone, hands down. Apple made it, so I know it will be the best,” she said. iPhone fans wait for hours for the new 5S Not everyone waiting in line will get an iPhone on Friday. Apple Stores usually have the most in stock, but they also draw the longest lines. The gold iPhone 5S seemed to be the most popular choice for the iPhanatics. Georgia Tech student Chance Shafor, the first in line in Atlanta’s Lenox Square, said he wants a gold iPhone 5S because it’s “new and shiny.” Retailers including Best Buy ( BBY , Fortune 500 ) will also have the new iPhones, as will carriers AT&T ( T , Fortune 500 ), Verizon ( VZ , Fortune 500 ), Sprint ( S , Fortune 500 ) and T-Mobile ( TMUS ). But their inventory usually sells out more quickly. Related story: Pay someone to wait in line for your new iPhone 5S sells out in London: Scores of Apple fans in London went home disappointed after the iPhone 5S sold out at the city’s flagship store in under two hours.

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Orchestrated by Shinnyo-en, an international Buddhist community, more than 2,200 candle-lit paper lanterns with individually-written messages of peace were set afloat onto a large reflecting pool in the center of Trump Rink, in honor of people who have dedicated their lives to the cause of peace. (Photo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20130922/NY84121 ) The first Shinnyo Lantern Floating for Peace drew thousands of visitors from around the world representing all five boroughs of New York City, and countries as far away as Australia, Brazil, France and Japan. The Shinnyo Lantern Floating is based on a traditional Buddhist ceremony and has been adapted by Her Holiness Shinso Ito, Head Priest of Shinnyo-en and one of the highest-ranking woman Buddhist leaders in the world, to provide an opportunity for all people regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, or religious tradition to come together and offer a collective message for peace. “All of us at Shinnyo-en, one million strong, were honored to join with New Yorkers and with visitors from all over the world in a collective moment to work toward building peace,” said Her Holiness Shinso Ito. “Our own ceremonies are aimed toward building on the prayers and values that have accumulated during the 2,500-year history of Buddhism. Our prayers express the interconnectedness of the past, present, and future. Through our rites and rituals, we honor the countless lives that have come before us, to whom we owe the present. We gain insight and judgment from them on how to live today, and how to open the doors to a better, more peaceful tomorrow.” Photos from the Shinnyo Lantern Floating for Peace ceremony can be found here: http://mm.gettyimages.com/mm/nicePath/gyipa_public?nav=pr196334857 Shinnyo-en is dedicated to helping people from all backgrounds and faiths realize greater self-awareness, happiness, and harmony for the good of humanity. For many years the organization wished to create the lantern floating experience in Central Park during the month of September to galvanize the international, interfaith and multicultural communities and reinforce the message that each individual has the potential to promote peace in their everyday lives. Shinnyo-en has conducted contemporary Shinnyo Lantern Floating ceremonies around the world, in settings as diverse as Hawaii and Kenya. The unprecedented event in New York City involved the construction of a specially-designed reflecting pool, built over 50 hours, and filled with more than 30,000 gallons of water. Visitors assembled individual paper and wood lanterns by hand and inscribed them with personal messages of peace before setting them afloat on the reflecting pool. More than 2,200 lanterns were set afloat throughout the day-long event. At dusk, a special Closing Ceremony was led by Her Holiness that included music and cultural performances by local New York City artists.