Manufacturing In New York Area Cools As Sales, Hiring Slow

U.S. Market Should Be Part of a Portfolio: Shiller

Undercover police officer Matt Rodriguez, 28, has worked in plainclothes fighting crime in New York City’s subways and was recently assigned to an elite undercover unit in Internal Affairs, the New York Police Department unit that fights police corruption. But when CBS News met Rodriguez at the district attorney’s office Tuesday, he was the one on the hot seat, CBS News senior correspondent John Miller reported on “CBS This Morning” Wednesday. NYC motorcycle road rage incident may have ruined a large investigation Rodriguez and his lawyer, Pat Bonanno, emerged from a meeting with prosecutors after more than an hour of discussions over the case of the motorcycle assault against SUV driver Alexian Lien in front of his wife and child. Rodriguez said he had nothing to do with the assault. Miller asked Rodriguez, “How hard has this been going through this, especially with all the attention?” Rodriguez said, “It has been difficult, but I can only take it one day at a time from now on.” Rodriguez is now the second New York City undercover officer to come forward to say he was riding with the group that was involved in the assault. Just last week, the first undercover New York City detective who came forward was charged with assault, riot and criminal mischief after investigators said he lied about his role in the attack on the SUV. The lawyer for Rodriguez says his client’s story checks out. Miller asked, “What you told him was you weren’t there for any assault, you weren’t part of any assault, you didn’t even witness any assault?” Bonanno interrupted, saying, “John, with all due respect, I’m gonna stop you right there.” Bonanno says his client had fallen to the rear of the pack of motorcycles and that he didn’t see the confrontation where the SUV was surrounded by motorcycles and drove over two of them to escape. Rodriguez reportedly told investigators he took a different exit off the highway to visit his grandfather in a nursing home, so he was never even on the street where the final assault took place. Bonanno said, “Police Officer Matt Rodriguez voluntarily presented himself to the Manhattan district attorney’s office to answer any and all questions and concerns the had regarding his alleged involvement of the incidents of September 29th. It appears hat the district attorney’s office will discover, as we have known from day one, that there are no acts of criminality on behalf of Matthew Rodriguez.” Asked how it felt to sit down with investigators and get his story out, Rodriguez said, “I was just glad to be given the opportunity to actually say my piece.” Miller asked Bonanno, “Is it appropriate for police officers to be part of some motorcycle gang?” “Number one, this is not a motorcycle gang,” Bonanno said. “Frontline Soldiers was a small group of law enforcement individuals and former veterans. NYPD itself has a motorcycle club, so he was part of an organization of other law enforcement individuals that he thought was involved in charitable organizations and charitable things.” Miller added on “CBS This Morning” that Rodriguez has not been suspended or put on modified assignment, which is assigned to desk duty without a badge or a gun, but prosecutors do have other questions for him, including what contact he did or didn’t have with other officers before, during and after the assault. And the police department, in their internal investigation, will also want to know why he waited as long as he did to come forward when the investigation was highly publicized. For more on this case, watch John Miller’s full report above.

New York pupils could get Muslim school holidays

A gauge of shipments declined to 13.1 from a 16-month high of 16.4 in September. Factory managers said inventories were little changed this month after climbing in September for the first time in more than a year. Stronger orders and weaker inventories is not exactly a bad combination for the production outlook, Neil Dutta, head of U.S. economics at Renaissance Macro Research LLC in New York, said in a report. The index of prices paid was little changed at 21.7 compared with 21.5, while prices received decreased to 2.4 from 8.6. A measure of factory employment weakened to 3.6 from 7.5. Factory executives in the New York Fed region viewed the future with a bit more optimism. The barometer of their outlook six months from now rose to 40.8, the highest since April 2012, from 40.6. Economists monitor the New York report and Philadelphia Fed factory readings, due on Oct. 17, for clues about the Institute for Supply Management figures on U.S. manufacturing.

New York schools currently have mandatory holidays for the Christian festivals Easter and Christmas, and the Jewish holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Passover. But the school term often clashes with Islam’s biggest festivals of Eid al-Adha and Eid al-Fitr, forcing Muslim children to choose between religion or study. Democratic candidate Bill de Blasio, the frontrunner in the race to be mayor, has told Muslim voters that New York should respect everyone’s faith. “That’s why we have to respect people of Muslim faith by providing the Eid school holidays for children in our school system,” he said Wednesday. It was unfair, de Blasio said, for Muslim children to have to decide between observing the religious holiday or sitting for an exam that could fall on the same day. “They can’t do both under our current system,” the mayoral candidate added. “We try to make sure that with children of other faiths they don’t have to face that conundrum and it shouldn’t happen to Muslim children either. It will take some time to resolve, but I know we can do it.” Opinion polls give de Blasio a huge lead in the race for the November 5 election. The next mayor will formally take office on January 1, 2014. His main Republican party opponent, Joe Lhota, has also indicated support for granting Muslim school holidays. At a campaign stop in Brooklyn, Lhota acknowledged that New York’s Muslim population was rising. “Their religion needs to be respected as all other religions are respected,” he was quoted as saying by the New York Daily News. Thirteen percent of New York school children are Muslim. In 2008, the city administration passed a unanimous resolution calling for two days’ holiday for the main Muslim festivals, but it has never been implemented. Current Mayor Michael Bloomberg opposed the move on the grounds that it could invite a flood of similar requests.