Hollywood’s Latino ‘king’ Rodriguez Having Fun With ‘machete Kills’

Witches casting a spell over Hollywood

And it’s like they never let you watch women fall down.” Shailene Woodley “I’m so young, and I’m single, and I just want to drift. I’m just going to be a drifter. I want to do something totally different before Insurgent [the second film in the Divergent trilogy]. Maybe I’ll work in a tea shop. Or live in Amsterdam. Or be a nanny. Life experience only helps us as actors. I need new experiences to draw upon.” Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow Tom Cruise films a scene at the ‘Oblivion’ movie set at the Empire State Building on June 13, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ray Tamarra/Getty Images) Blake Lively rehearses a scene at the ‘Gossip Girl’ movie set in Midtown Manhattan on July 17, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ray Tamarra/Getty Images) Kristen Wiig and Ben Stiller rehearse a scene at ‘The Secret Life of Walter Mitty’ movie set in Midtown Manhattan on May 30, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ray Tamarra/Getty Images) Actor Russell Crowe rehearses a scene at the ‘Winter’s Tale’ film set in the Meatpacking District on December 12, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Ray Tamarra/Getty Images) Director Martin Scorsese and actor Leonardo DiCaprio on the set of the film The Wolf of Wall Street on the streets of Manhattan on September 28, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Bobby Bank/WireImage) Dane Dehaan and Daniel Radcliffe are sighted on the set of Kill Your Darlings on March 20, 2012 in New York City.

Elle’s Women In Hollywood Issue Features Reese, Penelope, Shailene And Melissa

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“I want to keep giving Latinos the chance to work both in front of and behind the cameras, and to create content through my network,” the 45-year-old movie maker told Efe. “These newcomers should be able show what they can do without depending on Hollywood, where it’s really hard to get started,” he said. The writer of films like “El Mariachi,” “Desperado,” the kiddie saga “Spy Kids” and “Sin City” – whose sequel will debut next summer – premieres this Saturday the sequel of “Machete,” which was such a success that it took its own creator by surprise. While for the original film Rodriguez worked with such headliners as Robert De Niro, Jessica Alba, Steven Seagal and Lindsay Lohan, this time he’s going all out by adding to the cast Lady Gaga, Mel Gibson, Sofia Vergara, Demian Bichir, Charlie Sheen, Antonio Banderas and more. “The idea of a Latino action superhero in a ‘Mexploitation’ film – with a low budget and elements of exploitation film and Mexican culture – was overwhelming. I thought it would go directly to a DVD but it unexpectedly took off,” he said. Danny Trejo, 69, repeats his role as Hollywood’s first Latino superhero, a one-time federal agent recruited by the president of the United States to nab a revolutionary and an arms dealer who have joined forces to plunge the world into chaos. “I didn’t have a lot of time, but the screenplay was such fun I wanted to make it mine before shooting ‘Sin City 2.’ I did it really fast, in 29 days. I wanted to have a good time with the actors,” the filmmaker said, who doesn’t hesitate to combine wild humor and violence whatever the critics might say. Follow us on twitter.com/foxnewslatino

Hollywood away from home: Where the stars stay in Vancouver

Some, such as Matt Damon, find refuge in palatial homes tucked behind iron gates and old-growth cedars on the North Shore. Others, like John Cusack, live large in downtown suites with panoramic views, a pool table, chandeliers and a private hot tub. A few rent out entire floors of hotels, including Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes, who nabbed the penthouse of the Shangri-La Hotel while filming Mission: Impossible a Ghost Protocol, and Jennifer Aniston, who reportedly booked up the top floor of the Metropolitan Hotel while here in 2008. —– CLICK HERE to view images inside the homes, or if you’re using a mobile app, tap the story image and swipe. —– Generally, celebrities want to be right downtown or on the North Shore, said Chad Kalyn, rental manager at Unique Accommodations, a local company that specializes in finding houses and suites for the stars. The bigger the star, the more substantial the budget, which tops out in Metro Vancouver at $50,000 per month to rent a furnished home, said Kalyn. Budgets in the film industry typically start at $2,500 per month for back-end production people, while the actors snap up properties at the top of the scale. aThe most expensive rentals we have are $50,000,a he said. aThey are mainly on the North Shore, and a couple of downtown penthouses. Itas the A-list people who are taking those; all the stars of the (biggest) movies.a For Hollywoodas elite, Vancouveras west side usually doesnat offer enough privacy, he added. aWeare talking a $50,000 budget on the water, gated homes, things like that.a Unique Accommodations has housed Renee Zellweger, Hugh Jackman, Ben Affleck and Jen Garner, Halle Berry, Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson in recent years. Theyave also worked with the stars from Elysium, This Means War and X-Men, to name a few. When Matt Damon arrived with his family in the summer of 2011 to film Elysium, he kept a low profile, popping up now and again to purchase an ice cream cone or mosy around West Vancouver. But you can bet he was among the A-listers with a $50,000-per-month rental budget, shacking up in one of the North Shoreas finest architectural treasures. John Cusack paid about $25,000 per month for a 2,500-sq-ft False Creek condo while working here on two occasions, complete with 360-degree water and city views, pool table and 1,600-sq-foot deck with hot tub.

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TheWrap obtained a transcript of the conversation, which Assange began by calling the HFPA’s creation of the Golden Globes in the early 1940s “basically a hack into the studio system” and “an amazing, successful coup” in getting stars and moviemakers to address the foreign press. Some of the conversation dealt with “The Fifth Estate,” in which Benedict Cumberbatch plays Assange – and rather than go into detail about why he thinks the film is inaccurate and “a hostile endeavor,” Assange turned analyst and said the movie “is destined to be a box-office failure,” because audiences prefer “combative underdog” stories. While Cumberbatch approached his subject asking for a meeting, which Assange declined (in the process trying to persuade the actor not to appear in the movie), Assange criticized the filmmakers for not approaching him or WikiLeaks, and for not contributing to his defense fund or to WikiLeaks. “I don’t think we are in a situation anymore where an organization like DreamWorks or Disney … can succinctly decide that it is going to produce a movie about living people, and living political refugees, and people who are embroiled in a grand jury proceeding in the United States, and just smear, without the cost,” he said. Gibney, he said, was clearly biased against him, and “has [an] emotional engagement with me that is not proper for a journalist to have.” Assange did repeatedly praise one movie about his company – “Mediastan,” a new WikiLeaks-produced documentary. But although the conversation took place with a number of entertainment journalists, Assange spent most of his time railing against the U.S. and British security complexes that he said forced him to seek asylum in the Eucadorian embassy. The Australian-born Assange, 42, is currently facing a European Arrest Warrant in a Swedish investigation into sexual assault; although he said, “I assume the Swedish case will disappear on its own accord in due course,” he refuses to turn himself in out of fear that Sweden would extradite him to the United States to face charges in the publication of U.S. military and diplomatic documents supplied by Bradley Manning (who now goes by the name Chelsea Manning). “If you seriously tangle with the United States security complex…you will suffer the consequences,” he said. “Of course it’s difficult to wake up over 500 days and see the same walls, but on the other hand I am doing good work,” added Manning, who said WikiLeaks was in contact with fugitive NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. “I have no time for anything else now but work, so it’s a bit of a counter-productive maneuver to trap me here, because what else can I do but work?” Dimissing one question about whether his leaks put people in danger as “a Pentagon propaganda talking point” and a “malicious smear,” Assange insisted that U.S.

Julian Assange to the Hollywood Foreign Press: “The Fifth Estate’ is going to fail’

Kathy Najimy, left, Bette Midler and Sarah Jessica Parker are likely somewhere running amok and hunting down virgins on your cable TV right about now. After “explaining it all” on Nickelodeon as Clarissa, Melissa Joan Hart moved on to another starring TV role that’s just as memorable. As the teenage witch Sabrina in the ABC show of the same name, Hart supplied witchy comedy — along with her snarky black cat, Salem — to the young adult set from 1996 to 2003. No disrespect to stars Robin Tunney, back right, Rachel True, front right, or Neve Campbell, back left, but Fairuza Balk’s Nancy was the baddest witch in “The Craft’s” coven. When not being mined for style inspiration, this 1996 horror flick can still give nightmares. In 1998, Shannen Doherty’s bad girl ways were back on TV with a magical twist. The former “Beverly Hills, 90210” star was cast as the oldest Halliwell sister on “Charmed,” which also starred Holly Marie Combs, left, Alyssa Milano and, later on, Rose McGowan. Although initially unaware of their magical roots, this trio of sisters was soon saving the world from (sometimes sexy) demons on a weekly basis. Even with her tendencies to stray to the dark side, the resident witch on “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” Willow Rosenberg, left, played by Alyson Hannigan, was one of the craftiest (and smartest) on TV. Her teaming up with the magically gifted Tara (Amber Benson) was a natural upgrade. Sandra Bullock, left, and Nicole Kidman as a pair of sister witches in 1998’s “Practical Magic” is more endearing than scary. Part comedy, part romance and part thriller, the duo’s portrayal of a pair of humorous witches is a guilty pleasure.