Can Spanish Survive In The Usa?

USA presidential candidate answers wide-ranging questions in public forum (photos)

Riding shotgun to Alabama, Oregon took a break from putting 60 points on the scoreboard and enjoyed a bye in Week 4. The Ducks will host California in Week 5 to close out September. As for the rest of the Top 10, this past weekend featured very little adversity. Clemson defeated NC State by 12 points on the road in Thursday night’s prime-time showdown while Ohio State, Stanford, Louisville, LSU, Florida State, Texas A&M and Georgia all won by at least 14 points at home. The Buckeyes made arguably the biggest statement, though, drubbing Florida A&M 76-0 behind six touchdown passes from backup quarterback Kenny Guiton, who set a school record in Braxton Miller ‘s absence. In other early-afternoon action, Heisman Trophy candidate Teddy Bridgewater tossed four touchdowns as Louisville won 72-0 over Florida International. Ohio State’s bitter rival Michigan, survived a scare on the road at Connecticut in prime time on Saturday night. Despite trailing by 14 points in the second half, the Wolverines were able to take the lead on a late field goal and go on to win 24-21 after shutting down the Huskies on their final drive. David Butler II-USA TODAY Sports Which is the best team in America after four weeks? Alabama Submit Vote vote to see results Which is the best team in America after four weeks? Alabama 9.2% Total votes: 829 But while the Wolverines were struggling to stay unbeaten, Miami (FL) and Baylor were making it look easy. Like Ohio State and Louisville, the Hurricanes and Bears each hung 70 points on their overwhelmed opponents at home on Saturday. Both are 3-0 after four weeks.

While she knows that’s not enough to make them fluent, she hopes the exposure will pique their interest and that they’ll want to learn their grandparents’ language later on in life. “I don’t want (Spanish) to die with them. I don’t want them to grow up and not know what it means to be Latino or not know what it means to be Mexican American,” laments Condes. “I don’t know who they’re going to marry, so I would love for them to learn Spanish and as much about our culture as I can teach them.” Condes’ anxiety is justified, according to Rivera-Mills. “Interlinguistic” marriages, as she likes to call them, have played a significant role in the steady decline of Spanish usage among Latinos. “The home, by far, continues to be the last and strongest enclave for language to be transmitted from one generation to the other,” says Rivera-Mills. “And when the home is eroded, then that transmission becomes weaker and weaker.” Liliana Awori agrees. Awori’s bilingual Honduran mother opted not to teach her Spanish. So when Awori married an immigrant from Kenya and later became a mom, she figured the only way to prevent the disappearance of her heritage language would be through bilingual education for her children. She enrolled the eldest of her three daughters in a dual-language immersion program at an elementary school in Pasadena, Calif. The daughter is taught mostly in Spanish, and Awori couldn’t be happieror more proudof the results after only one year.

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At 4 p.m., he took part in a public forum at USAs Mitchell Center. Before a crowd of about 200, he gave a PowerPoint presentation outlining his goals and ideas for the university, then took questions from the audience. Gilberts goals included improving the universitys retention rate of 68 percent and its graduation rate of 37 percent; creating more of an international focus for the universitys research programs; and attracting more businesses to the universitys Technology & Research Park. Doug Marshall, president of USAs Faculty Senate and a member of the presidential search committee, started the question-and-answer session by asking Gilbert if it was important, given the size of USAs health care division, to encourage the health care and university divisions to become more collaborative. The more we can get them working together, the better, Gilbert responded. I would do all that I could try to do bring the two divisions together as often as possible. Marshall also asked how Gilbert envisioned a typical faculty members workday in the future. Across the country, things are changing for faculty members, Gilbert said. Theyre more focused on research as we go forward. There is going to be more demand on faculty to be involved in knowledge creation and research. An audience member asked for Gilberts opinion on the universitys reliance on faculty adjunct professors. I think there is a place for a variety of different faculty types, Gilbert said, but relying too heavily on adjuncts is not a good idea. Other questions focused on ideas for expanding campus activities, enhancing the universitys role in the community and improving campus communication. Gilbert was also asked about his favorite charities (Habitat for Humanity, a foundation to assist public schools, the Starkville arts council); which professional journals he reads (The Chronicle of Higher Education); and his favorite book (1776 by David McCullough). It was great to field all the questions, Gilbert said after the session. He emphasized his goal to expand the universitys partnerships with Mobiles businesses and industry. I think theres a great opportunity for Mobile to do integrated research projects, and advance the university and businesses in the area, he said.